2020 Editor’s Introduction

A word from JEDS Co-Founder

About the 2020 JEDS Issue

Welcome to the issue! The process for JEDS deliberately focuses on guiding authors through the writing and publication process. Authors often work one-on-one with an editor to develop and deepen their work. Themes of this issue are addressed in the video below; additionally, at the start of each individual article an editor gives a brief video introduction for that particular article.This year the JEDS Editorial team is made up of three dance artist-scholars who are committed to the pedagogical nature of the JEDS experience. Read about them below.

Dr. Priyanka Basu is the Curator of the ‘Two Centuries of Indian Print’ project and the Interim Co-Head of South Asia Collections at the British Library. She is currently finishing her manuscript based on her doctoral research – The Cultural Politics of Folk: Perspectives from Bangladesh and India – forthcoming from Routledge (South Asian History and Culture Series). Since 2018 she has been curating and running the British Library South Asia Seminar Series. She is an elected Member of the Royal Historical Society in the UK, a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society and an Honorary Research Fellow at the Institute of Advanced Studies at UCL. She is also the Book Reviews Editor for the Journal of South Asian History and Culture and an Editorial Board Member of Festival Culture: Research & Education. Her research interests include print cultures and book history, performance histories, politics of folk cultures, gender and dance studies.

Dr. Ilana Morgan, Assistant Professor of Dance at Texas Woman’s University (TWU), researches dance education as social justice with incarcerated and detained youth, focusing on dance experiences and choreography as an expressive and restorative practice. Her research in dance education and advocacy considers issues of confinement and freedom, governmental approaches to rehabilitation, juvenile justice, autonomy, democracy, and trauma-informed pedagogy. She has published articles in the Journal of Dance Education, the Journal of Emerging Dance Scholarship, and has a chapter in the book Dance Education and Responsible Citizenship: Promoting Civic Engagement through Effective Dance Pedagogies. At TWU she teaches dance pedagogy and theory courses, coordinates the MA in Dance and the BA in Dance with Teacher Certification, mentors student teachers, and advises PhD and MA students. She is also the Director of TWU’s Community Dance Center which provides low-cost, high quality dance classes for Denton community members.

Dr. Julie Mulvihill is a teaching artist who researches relationships and collaboration in dance making processes. Julie has taught widely across several university programs as well as in the Boston Public School system (K-5), for Arts Together Preschool, and many community and private organizations throughout the U.S. Julie is published in JODE, Exchange Journal from ATI, and JEDS where she now serves on the editorial committee. She presents regularly at conferences in addition to presenting choreography at the Monterey Bay Choreographer’s Showcase, with HEMP Dance Project, with Crossover Movement Arts, and as part of the Rainbow Dance Company. Julie holds a PhD in Dance Theory and Practice from TWU and a teaching certification in the Alexander Technique from Chesapeake Bay Alexander Studies. Dancing and making dances with others profoundly inform Julie’s ideas about teaching and learning, which in turn impact her research.